Mexico

Puedes leer este artículo en español a continuación…

Hey amigos!

Mexico, what can we say? What an amazingly beautiful country!! Filled with tradition, culture, history, amazing food, kind and welcoming people and tremendous natural beauty and natural diversity–both in its people and in all things natural (flora, fauna, food, topography, animal life and more). When the US was but a sparkle in the British Monarch’s eye, Mexico had been home to numerous civilizations for thousands of years; it had been the cradle of civilization in North America, built numerous pyramids including The Great Pyramid of Cholula, also known as Tlachihualtepetl (Nahuatl for “made-by-hand mountain”) is the largest in the world–yes, even bigger than Giza) and, through unmatched powers of celestial observation, analysis and advanced knowledge and use of astronomy and mathematics, they were the only ancient civilization to use the concept of “zero” and their sophisticated astronomical and mathematical skills led to the creation of the most accurate calendar systems in human history, beating out the calendars created and used in Europe. On the topic of understanding the concept of zero, the Canadian Museum of History’s website covering a brief overview of Mayan history notes: “That the Maya understood the value of zero is remarkable – most of the world’s civilizations had no concept of zero at that time.”

IMG_0528

Today, however, Mexico has become the US’ punching bag for politicians wanting to find a scapegoat for the many ills facing Americans and our country–most of which are self-created IMO. The many issues facing our country, and frankly many facing our North and Central American neighbors, are definitely “Made in the USA.” Years of US intervention in Central American politics, including installation of political puppets, and the drug trade itself were supported by the CIA, DEA and past US governments going back to the early days of Pablo Escobar. Don’t believe me? (I didn’t believe it either until I started seriously researching). Watch the movie American Made with Tom Cruise, based on the true story of how drugs were initially allowed to enter into the US. Secondly, watch the Untold History of the United States on Netflix (by Oliver Stone).

The vitriol that has been directed at Mexico and the outright racism towards its people are both keys reasons I decided to leave the US, live in Mexico, contribute to the Mexican economy, and blog about the beauty of Mexico and its people, to highlight the tremendous contributions Mexico has made to the world and to humanity as a whole.

After all, Mexico is #7 in the world and #1 in the Americas with the most UNESCO World Heritage Sites. On the topic of Intangible Cultural Heritage (separate from the sites)–essentially, contributions to humanity–Mexico ranks #11 in the world with another nine contributions recognized, including: Charrería (equestrian tradition in Mexico); Mariachi; Traditional Mexican Cuisine (more about that below); Ritual Ceremony of the Voladores; and, the Festivity of the “Day of the Dead.”

Yea, pretty rich, eh?!! Yet, most people around the globe and, specifically, most Americans have little understanding or even less appreciation for how rich in culture and history Mexico truly is and their many contributions to North American and to the history of the world. Mexico (or when speaking of ancient Mexico we use the term Mesoamerica, as it is referred to by ancient civilization scholars) is recognized as one img_0631.jpgof six cradles of civilization–that is, one of six civilizations in the world to develop autonomously into an advanced and sophisticated society to include high levels of culture, science, industry, education and governance. These ancient civilizations encompass the world’s first cities, writing systems and large scale governments. It should be noted that Mesoamerica, as defined by scholars and archeologists, includes present day Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and the most northern part of Costa Rica. However, the nucleus and cultural center of Mesoamerica has, for the most part, resided in present-day Mexico and in the days of the Maya civilization, that center resided in the most southern part of Mexico bordering Guatemala.

Okay, let’s talk turkey! I’m not sure if you know this, but the very symbol of American and Canadian Thanksgiving, the turkey, is indigenous to Mexico and they domesticated this bird for consumption around 800 B.C.E., Native Americans in what is now the U.S. did not began using the Turkey for meat until around 1,000 C.E. This is one of Mexico’s many contributions not only to North America but to the world as a whole. In fact, the Aztecs had a name for the turkey “guajolote” (a Nahuatl word) which is still used in Mexican Spanish today, as well as the more common term “pavo.” Gobble, gobble!

Further, one can make out some (but not all) of the fruits, vegetables, legumes and other items (like gum and sandals) that originated in ancient Mexico via the Spanish (and sometimes English) name used to describe it today. In this brief list below, you will note the original Nahuatl word for each item, which became a loan-word in some cases and in other cases there are alternate Spanish words for the same items. This is where we start to get into the nuances of “Mexican Spanish.” Some words have carried through from Nahuatl to Spanish to English, think: Aguacate (slight variation: avocado), Coyote, Chocolate, Guacamole, Chile (or Chilli – this is the original Nahuatl spelling which is used in British English), Chipotle and so on.

In future blogs, we will dive deeper and learn more about these fruits, vegetables and other Mexican contributions; for now, here’s that list I mentioned:

Mexican Word Nahuatl Word English Translation General Spanish
Aguacate Ahuacatl  Avocado Aguacate; in French, “avocat”
Atole Atolli prehispanic drink popular in Mexico and Central America Atole
Cacahuate Tlacucahuatl Peanut Sometimes “cacahuete” o “mani”; in French “cacahuète” o “arachide”
Camote Camotli Sweet potato Batata
Capulín Kapol-in Cherry Cereza
Chapulin chapol-in Grasshopper Saltamontes
Chayote Chayotli A type of Mexican squash Chayote
Chicle Chictli Gum Chicle
Chile Chilli  chilli pepper Chile o Ají
Chipotle Chilpoctli Chipotle (same name) type of red chile Chipotle (tipo de chile)
Chiquito tzitz quit Very small Pequeño o chico
Chocolate Chocolatl Chocolate Chocolate o en Catalán (Xocolate)
Comal comalli smooth, flat griddle typically used in Mexico to cook tortillas, toast spices, sear meat Plancha
Coyote Coyotl Coyote (same name) Coyote
Cuate Cuatl Twin or slang for buddy Gemelo, Mellizo
Elote ēlō-tl Corn on the Cob Maiz en la Mazorca; in French cacahuète”
Escuincle Itzcuintli  Small Child (also is a hairless prehispanic dog) Chico
Guacamole Ahuaca-molli Guacamole (same name) Guacamole
Guajolote wueh-xōlō-tl Turkey Pavo
Huarache kwarachi Sandal Sandalia

The ancient Mexican civilizations subsisted on a mostly plant-based diet with animal meat reserved for nobility or for special occasions. Mexico also did not have animals of burden (large animals that existed in Europe which europeans domesticated for agriculture and food). These large animals (think cow, ox, horse) are not indigenous to Mesoamerica. The largest (edible) domesticated animals in Mesoamerica were the turkey and a pig-like creature called a Peccary, among other smaller animals such as the dog, the iguana and a rich variety of fish and seafood. The incredible diversity of fruits, legumes and vegetables that were indigenous to the region, resulted in a diet that was mostly plant-based.

Did you know? Mexican cuisine is only one of two (the other being Japanese cuisine) to receive UNESCO Intangible cropped-img_0705-2.jpgCultural Heritage status for its contribution to humanity. France’s “gastronomic meal” and the mediterranean diet have also received UNESCO status. It’s worth noting the nuance here; recognizing a cuisine differs from recognizing a meal or diet. Mexican and Japanese cuisine have been recognized for their use of indigenous ingredients, their technique and for original recipes that have survived thousands of years, in Mexico’s case many original recipes survived over 300 years of colonization, violent subjugation and purposeful intent by the Spanish to eradicate the indigenous ways of eating.

I am Mexican-American and yet, I had to learn all of the above and didn’t do so until after age 35. Why? Because as an American, we are hardly taught anything about Mexico or the amazing contributions of Mesoamerica, despite being neighbors and despite the United States, as we know it, heavily benefiting from the accomplishments of this civilization.

Mesoamerica’s civilizations domesticated corn around 6,000-7,000 B.C.E. (that’s 10,000 years ago counting the 2,000 years we’ve lived in the C.E.). They also domesticated cotton approximately 6,000 years ago and tobacco–interestingly, corn and tobacco being two crops that underpinned American wealth and development from the time of the first settlers in Jamestown in 1607 to 1750, when the industrial revolution began taking hold and many of the ancient agricultural practices were modernized and many of the farmers who’d made their fortunes farming tobacco, cotton and corn invested their fortunes in new technology and markets. These agricultural techniques were spread to what is now the United States by amerindian natives who migrated north. Without corn and other foods and animals domesticated in Mesoamerica (squash/pumpkins and the aforementioned Turkeys) and more importantly, without the agricultural know-how needed to grow these foods, the pilgrims would have starved to death.

Source: America’s Story – Colonial America (1492 – 1763)

“In both Virginia and Massachusetts, the colonists flourished with some [note: throughout history and in our own US textbooks, the contribution of the natives is continually downplayed] assistance from Native Americans. New World grains such as corn kept the colonists from starving while, in Virginia, tobacco provided a valuable cash crop. By the early 1700s enslaved Africans made up a growing percentage of the colonial population.”

The only other civilization to have domesticated cotton is India. Is it any coincidence that both cultures have loads of traditional clothing that are filled with color, innovative weaving techniques and many are made of cotton? No, not really.

As I’ve mentioned, I am a second-generation Mexican-American and yet I had to learn everything that I have explained here for myself, studying and researching for many years, and wasn’t until I was 35 years old and had traveled to Spain a few times that I became very interested in ancient Mexico and Mexican history. Why? Because as Americans, we are taught most of what matters is what happened in the U.S. and to some extent Europe–but we truly don’t study much of that either. Almost nothing is taught about Mexico or the incredible contributions of Mesoamerica (or America in general, there are also the Incas who were a wonderful civilization), despite being neighbors and despite the fact that the United States, being we are on the same continent, has greatly benefited from the achievements of this civilization.

The other reason that I did not know the great history of Mexico and its contributions to the world and humanity is because, unfortunately, colonization had the effect of robbing the people of Mexico of their own history and making them ashamed of their indigenous cultures and customs. For hundreds of years, the Spaniards controlled education and denied education to the majority of the mestizo and indigenous people. The result? There are many Mexican people born and raised in Mexico who do not know their own history and their contribution to the world and this is not the fault of the people, rather it is a consequence of colonization that is lived today. For those of us born in the U.S., our parents didn’t really discuss Mexican history with us. They passed on Mexican culture and traditions, for sure, but rarely did I hear an elder speak of Mesoamerica and the civilizations of ancient Mexico.

Further, in the US, despite the country being built on the backs of slaves, we rarely if ever get educated on their origins and the civilizations of their ancestors. It is a form of control, because as long as people feel lost, unsure of their place and ashamed for being of Native American, African or Mexican descent (for example), self-esteem is affected, progress in our communities remains stagnant and all of this promotes inequality; and of course, discrimination is not far behind! But, I think (well, it’s my opinion) that the internet and the democratization of information will change this very soon. For this reason, I am committed to disseminating this knowledge, in English and Spanish (although my written Spanish is not perfect), because we who are Mexican-Americans also need to be aware of our roots and the stories of our ancestors.

In my future blogposts, we’ll explore the many contributions Mexico and the Mexican people have made to the world of food. Hello! Guacamole, chia, tomatoes, chilies, tacos, tamales, tortillas, squashes, beans, chocolate, pozole, mole, salsa, much of what vegan’s consume today and what we consider plant-based eating…and more! Stay tuned…

**********************************************

¡Hola chicos!

México… A ver, ¿qué podemos decir? Qué es un país increíble … lleno de tradición, cultura, historia, con comida sabrosa y compleja, su gente amable y sincera y con una tremenda belleza natural y diversidad natural, tanto en su gente como en todas las cosas naturales (flora, fauna, comida, topografía, animales) y más. Cuando Estados Unidos no era más que un brillo en el ojo del Monarca británico, México había sido el hogar de numerosas civilizaciones, había sido la cuna de la civilización en Norte América, había construido sorprendentes pirámides (La Gran Pirámide de Cholula, también conocida como Tlachihualtepetl (náhuatl para “montaña hecha a mano”) es la más grande del mundo, sí, incluso más grande que Giza), y había creado un sistema de calendarios más precisos del mundo, superando los calendarios creados y utilizados en Europa.

IMG_0528Pero, tristemente, hoy en día, México ha convertido en la oveja negra de los EEUU para los políticos que quieren desviar la atención de los muchos males que enfrentan los estadounidenses y nuestro país (yo soy estadounidense). La mayoría de los problemas que nos enfrentamos en EEUU los creamos nosotros mismos. Esta injusticia, porque si lo es,  fue una de las razones clave por las que decidí vivir en México y crear un blog sobre la belleza de México y su gente, pero también para resaltar las tremendas contribuciones que México ha hecho al mundo y a la humanidad en general.

Vamos a establecer el escenario…México es el país número 7 en el mundo y el número uno con más sitios del Patrimonio Mundial de la UNESCO. Sobre el tema del Patrimonio Cultural Inmaterial (distinto a los sitios) – esencialmente, contribuciones a la humanidad – México ocupa el puesto # 11 en el mundo con otras nueve contribuciones reconocidas, que incluyen: Charrería (tradición ecuestre en México); Mariachi; Cocina tradicional mexicana (más sobre eso a continuación); Ceremonia Ritual de los Voladores; y, la Festividad del “Día de Muertos”.

¿Lo sabias, si o no? Sin embargo, la mayoría de las personas en todo el mundo, y específicamente la mayoría de los estadounidenses, tienen poca comprensión de lo rico en cultura e historia que es México y sus muchas contribuciones a la historia del mundo. México (o Mesoamérica, como lo llaman los expertos en civilizaciones antiguas) esimg_0631.jpg reconocido como una de las seis cunas de la civilización, es decir, una de las seiscivilizaciones en el mundo que se desarrollan autónomamente en una sociedad avanzada y sofisticada para incluir altos niveles de cultura , ciencia, industria, educación y gobierno. Estas civilizaciones antiguas abarcan las primeras ciudades del mundo, sistemas de escritura y gobiernos a gran escala. Cabe señalar que Mesoamérica, tal como lo definen los académicos y arqueólogos, incluye la actual Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua y la parte más al norte de Costa Rica. Sin embargo, el núcleo y centro cultural de Mesoamérica ha residido, en su mayor parte, en el México actual y en la época de la civilización maya, ese centro residía en la parte más meridional de México que se fronteriza con Guatemala.

En ingles estadounidense, tenemos un dicho que “Let’s talk turkey.” Este es un dicho coloquial que se usa entre trabajadores profesionales cuando van a negociar. El significado es, “Okay, vamos al grano” o “Vamos hablar en serio.”

Lo interesante es que el “turkey,” que es el símbolo asociado con el día de acción de gracias en EEUU y en Canadá, es indígena de México, donde se conoce como pavo—la palabra usada en general por hispanohablantes—o como guajolote, la palabra que usaba mi mama, mi tía y mi abuela! Esta es una palabra náhuatl (lengua de los aztecas). Por que es importante este dato? Porque cualquier objeto o producto alimentico que tiene un nombre en náhuatl es producto que origino y fue creado o domesticado—en caso de animales, plantas y frutas—en México. Y hay muchísimos!!

Hablaremos mas sobre estos en otros blogs, pero aquí les va una breve lista:

Mexican Word Nahuatl Word English Translation General Spanish
Aguacate Ahuacatl  Avocado Aguacate; en Francés, “avocat”
Atole Atolli prehispanic drink popular in Mexico and Central America Atole
Cacahuate Tlacucahuatl Peanut A veces “cacahuete” o “mani”; en Francés “cacahuète” o “arachide”
Camote Camotli Sweet potato Batata
Capulín Kapol-in Cherry Cereza
Chapulin chapol-in Grasshopper Saltamontes
Chayote Chayotli A type of Mexican squash Chayote
Chicle Chictli Gum Chicle
Chile Chilli  chilli pepper Chile o Ají
Chipotle Chilpoctli Chipotle (same name) type of red chile Chipotle (tipo de chile)
Chiquito tzitz quit Very small Pequeño o chico
Chocolate Chocolatl Chocolate (same name) Chocolate o en Catalán (Xocolate)
Comal comalli smooth, flat griddle typically used in Mexico to cook tortillas, toast spices, sear meat Plancha
Coyote Coyotl Coyote (same name) Coyote
Cuate Cuatl Twin or slang for buddy Gemelo, Mellizo
Elote ēlō-tl Corn on the Cob Maiz en la Mazorca
Escuincle Itzcuintli  Small Child (also is a hairless prehispanic dog) Chico
Guacamole Ahuaca-molli Guacamole (same name) Guacamole
Guajolote wueh-xōlō-tl Turkey Pavo
Huarache kwarachi Sandal Sandalia

Seguimos…las antiguas civilizaciones mexicanas subsistían en una dieta mayoritariamente basada en plantas. Es decir, muchas de sus comidas eran veganas porque tampoco tenían vacas y no bebían productos lácteos (como los europeos).

La carne de animal era reservada para la nobleza o para ocasiones especiales. México tampoco tenía animales de carga (animales grandes que los europeos domesticaron para la agricultura y la alimentación), ya que estos animales no son indígenas de Mesoamérica. Los animales domesticados más grandes (comestibles) en Mesoamérica eran el pavo y un animalitoparecido a un cerdo llamado Pecarí. Esto, junto con la increíble diversidad de frutas y verduras que eran nativas de la región, dio lugar a una dieta que se basa principalmente en las plantas. Gobble, gobble! (Asi suenan los “turkeys”). 😀

¿Sabías que la cocina mexicana es solo una de dos (la otra es la cocina japonesa) quecropped-img_0705-2.jpgrecibieron el estatus de Patrimonio Cultural Inmaterial de la UNESCO por su contribución a la humanidad? La tradición y el modo de comer de Francia y la dieta mediterránea también han recibido el estatus de UNESCO per vale la pena notar el matiz aquí. Reconocer una cocina es distinto al reconocer una comida o una dieta. La cocina mexicana y japonesa han sido reconocidas por su uso de ingredientes autóctonos y variados, su técnica y por recetas originales que han sobrevivido miles de años, en el caso de México muchas recetas originales sobrevivieron más de 300 años de colonización, subyugación violenta e intención resuelta por los españoles para erradicar las formas indígenas de comer.

Las civilizaciones de Mesoamérica domesticaron el maíz alrededor del 6.000-7.000 aC (son 10.000 años contando los 2.000 años que hemos vivido en la EC). También domesticaron el algodón hace aproximadamente 6.000 años y el tabaco, curiosamente, el maíz y el tabaco son dos cultivos que sustentaron la riqueza estadounidense en los años 1800/1900. Estas técnicas agrícolas se extendieron a lo que ahora es Estados Unidos por nativos amerindios que emigraron al norte. Sin maíz y otros alimentos y animales domesticados en Mesoamérica (calabaza y los pavos antes mencionados) y sin los conocimientos agrícolas necesarios para cultivar estos alimentos, los peregrinos que llegaron a los EEUU de Inglaterra se hubieran muerto de hambre.

Sin embargo, como ya lo sabemos, las contribuciones de la gente nativa de EEUU y de Mexico han side ignoradas y minimizadas. Echen un vistazo a este ejemplo:

Fuente: Historia de América – América colonial (1492 – 1763)

“Tanto en Virginia como en Massachusetts, los colonos florecieron con algo de [nota: a lo largo de la historia y en nuestros propios libros de texto de EE. UU., la contribución de los nativos es continuamente minimizada] asistencia de los nativos americanos. Los granos del Nuevo Mundo como el maíz evitaron que los colonos se murieran de hambre. En Virginia, el tabaco proporcionó un valioso cultivo comercial. A principios de los años 1700, los africanos esclavizados constituían un porcentaje creciente de la población colonial “.

En el tema de algodón…la única otra civilización, aparte de las civilizaciones Mesoamericanas, que domestico el algodón fue India. ¿Es una coincidencia que ambas culturas tengan un montón de ropa tradicional que está llena de color, tejido innovador con técnicas muy complejas y el amplio uso del algodón? No, en realidad no. En mis futuros blogs, exploraremos las muchas, muchas contribuciones que México y los mexicanos han hecho al mundo de la comida, como guacamole, chía, tomates, chiles, tacos, tamales, tortillas, calabazas, frijoles, chocolate, pozole, mole, salsa, vegetales … ¡y más! Mantente al tanto…

Como lo sabrán, yo soy mexicano-estadounidense de segunda generación y sin embargo, tuve que aprender todo lo que les he explicado aquí por mi misma, estudiando e investigando durante muchos años, y no lo hice hasta después de los 35 años. ¿Por qué? Porque como estadounidenses, casi no se nos enseña nada acerca de México ni de las increíbles contribuciones de Mesoamérica (o América en general, también están los Incas que fueron una civilización maravillosa), a pesar de ser vecinos y a pesar de que los Estados Unidos se ha beneficiado enormemente de los logros de esta civilización.

La otra razón que no conocí la gran historia de México y sus contribuciones al mundo y la humanidad es porque desgraciadamente la colonización tuvo los efectos de robar a la gente de México su propia historia, les hizo que tuvieran vergüenza de sus culturas y costumbres indígenas y por mucho tiempo, los españoles controlaban la educación y negaban educación a la mayoría del pueblo mestizo e indígena. ¿El resultado? Hay mucha gente mexicana nacidos y criados en México que no conocen su propia historia y su contribución al mundo y esto no es la culpa de la gente, mas bien es una consecuencia de colonización que se vive hoy en día. Lo vemos también en los EEUU donde ni la genta nativa ni la gente de proveniencia africana conocen las historias de sus antepasados. Es una forma de control, porque mientras la gente se sienta perdida, desalojada y avergonzada por ser de raíces indígenas, africanas o mexicanas (por ejemplo), el autoestima se afecta, el progreso permanece estancado y todo esto promueve la desigualdad (claro, la discriminación no se queda atrás!). Pero, yo pienso (bueno, es mi opinión) que con el internet y la democratización de la información, eso cambiara muy pronto.

Por este motivo, yo me he comprometido a difundir ese conocimiento—en ingles y español (aunque me español escrito no es perfecto), porque nosotros que somos mexicanos-estadounidenses también tenemos que estar consientes de nuestras raíces y las historias de nuestros antepasados.

*Unless otherwise noted, all photos used are my own from my personal travels.